Call Now To Talk To A Lawyer

Intérprete De Español Disponible Por Cita

In view of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are offering virtual and phone consultations for all our existing and new clients. Call or Email us to schedule an appointment. Keep in mind that if you would like to have a virtual meeting you will need a computer set up with a camera and microphone or you can use a smart phone.

What are the risk factors for traumatic brain injury?

| Aug 2, 2019 | Personal Injury |

Traumatic brain injuries in Virginia can range from the severe to the moderate to the relatively mild. However, any case of TBI is serious and should receive the attention of a physician to avoid potentially life-threatening complications. 

A TBI can happen to anyone, at any time. Nevertheless, according to the Mayo Clinic, there are some risk factors that, if present, can make you more susceptible. 

Age

The age groups most at risk for TBI include the elderly (60 years or older) and the very young (4 years old or younger). Both of these groups are at increased risk for falls, which are the most common cause of traumatic brain injury.

Occupation

Some occupations involve greater risk for TBI due to falls or other types of trauma. These may include projectiles or foreign objects that penetrate the skull and damage the brain. Examples of professions in which the risk of TBI is comparatively greater include the military and construction work. 

Activities

People who participate in certain types of sports may be at greater risk of experiencing TBI. The greater the potential for high impacts is, the greater the risk may be. This is one of the most common ways that youth sustain TBI. The risk is greater in the absence of helmets and other forms of protective gear. 

Exposure to violence

Physical assault is a common cause of TBI. Victims of prolonged violence, such as child abuse or domestic violence, may be at greater risk. Infants who endure violent shaking from a parent or caregiver are at risk of sustaining a specific type of TBI known as shaken-baby syndrome. 

The information in this article is not intended as legal advice but provided for educational purposes only.